Marvelous May Newsletter

Below you will find an excerpt from my May newsletter. To read the whole thing, including some new recipes, please click here. It is fun and fabulous!

Almonds
Everyone, including me, has been waiting for news on Richard’s fantastic Johnston and Somerton almonds, grown in the almond district, Willunga, south of Adelaide. I spoke to Richard on Tuesday. He told me there was a fabulous crop this year and he will be sending them sometime in June! Yippee!

swap crop logo

Introducing Crop Swap
Recently I came across an Australia and NZ group of people as keen as I am to share garden produce and, in fact, anything edible or related to food. So, I joined the group and made us a sub-group and website Crop Swap Cygnet and Surrounds. There are several others in Tasmania too. Please join the Crop Swap Cygnet and Surrounds facebook page for updates etc. If you would like to help me make this work, please contact me asap. I am really keen to get started! No money is involved at all. Whether you are a backyard gardener, home cook, forager, seedsaver, cuttings guru, pickle maker or bread baker, you are welcome.

Sundried apricots, pears, plums and peaches
Kevin and Cindy’s fabulous, new season’s organic, sundried fruits were supposed to be arriving this week but the silly freight people have not picked them up….. so it will now be the first June market before they arrive. Oh lalalalala, how do businesses survive that are run so badly? 

Rain-fed rice
The Qld floods inundated the Lismore freight depot but now they are up and running again. I am pleased to say that Slater Farms’ magnificent, fragrant, bio-dynamic, long grain rice did not get flooded and will be at the market, along with rain-fed medium grain rice and rain-fed rice flour too. 

May Sourdough Workshop-full 
I am pleased to say there are no places left for this workshop but I will be running another in late June or early July. Read about my sourdough workshops here.

More than just Permaculture
There are lots of permaculture design certificate courses but our Gumboot Gardeners group is helping to host something broader, deeper and more easily used for your own property. Please read about Julia and Charles’ course below, based on 25 years of teaching all over the world.

Just for a laugh
Here is a little video I made about 10 years ago, of how to easily dig in green manure. For some reason it is not playing as clearly as it used to! Check out the dry stone wall in the first few seconds. I built that, with stone from my yard when we were making terraces. I had to raid a roadside cutting to get a few bits to finish it off. It is a tricky, twisted circle, going above then below where I am standing, as it was on a massive slope!

Square eftpos
The Garden Shed and Pantry now has credit card, debit card, chip and contactless payment facilities! Square is a simple and cheap system suited to every form of transaction. It may be cheap but it is not free, so I would still prefer cash but no longer will there be any inconvenience if you do not have enough cash with you! 

March Newsletter

Read the headlines below and read the whole newsletter here.
Market stall site change
The whole Cygnet market will be outside for March! The Town Hall will be totally surrounded with stalls, front, back and both sides. I need such a big space that I am going to be out the back, next to the Lovett Gallery entrance. This means I can park right at my stall, which will be more wonderful than you can imagine!

Please come and see me and please tell your friends!

Hugh returns to the Cygnet Market
Some of you will know about the endless difficulties Hugh has had working in the very unprofessional environment of the bakery kitchen. The result is that he is no longer working there. Consequently he is able to return to the Cygnet Market this Sunday and bring you all of his masterpieces again. I am not sure where his stall will be but seek and ye shall find!

New Olive Oil
The olive crop at Patlins (and much of SA) last year did not produce as much oil as usual and they have run out BUT I have bought a beautiful oil from Mt. Zero Olives in Victoria, to tide us over to the next season. Frantoio is one of the best and much sought after. 

Pip Magazine Returns for 2017
Almost everyone here who lives in a house, grows some food, has a few chooks, or maybe has an acre or two to be put to good use. Learning how best to design your space for maximum ease of use, for maximum efficiency, maximum beauty, least harm to your environment and least stress is not always easy.

Pip is the magazine of Australian Permaculture and each issue covers a range of topics and ideas from near and far, to help people understand and incorporate practical systems into their everyday lives.

It is the only magazine I sell because I think it is the best one for us here in Tasmania. Issue 7 has just arrived. Check it out at the market on Sunday.

March Sourdough & Cultured Butter Workshop $55
I will be having my first sourdough and cultured butter workshop for 2017 later in March. Check the dates and make bookings by adding your EMAIL (not your name) here. If you don’t put your email you have not booked, even if I know you!!

You will find more information about these workshops on my website here.

Thanks for the Wine Bottles but please stop!
I rely on my wonderful customers to provide me with wine bottles, which I sterilise and fill with the olive oils and apple cider vinegar I sell. You have been most generous and I now have quite a few. I will let you know when I need more but for now I have enough, thanks.

Square eftpos
The Garden Shed and Pantry now has credit card, debit card, chip and contactless payment facilities! Square is a simple and cheap system suited to every form of transaction. It may be cheap but it is not free, so I would still prefer cash but no longer will there be any inconvenience if you do not have enough cash with you! 

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This is just the headlines. Read the whole newsletter here.

Eat food, not too much, mostly plants

These are Michael Pollan’s words and it really is (almost) that simple to stay healthy. I would change it to: eat WHOLE foods, not too much, mostly plants. What I mean is eat foods that have not been processed, like a whole apple, not a peeled one or an apple muesli bar or dried apple rings that have had preservative added. I rarely eat packaged food; I get ingredients and make them into a meal. Simple. That’s what everyone did for all of human history until recently!

Winter is coming
Don’t you love autumn; when the nights begin to chill, the orchard trees begin to lose their leaves and, hopefully, we get glorious rain to soothe the garden. Mice are starting to look for winter hide outs and birds have finished rearing their chicks. Chooks are starting to moult and it is time to plant out garlic again.

Do you ever think of your own body and what it is telling you about all this? Eating seasonal, local ingredients will naturally guide you to eat what you need to stay strong and healthy all year round whereas supermarket shopping will lure you in with bright colours but leave your body confused and irritable.

Now and into April is the time to sow all those beautiful Asian vegetables like bok choy, mizuna, mibuna etc as well as European winter greens kale, spinach, rainbow chard etc. Open any health book and it will tell you to eat LOTS of green, leafy vegetables as the days shorten, so right now is your chance to make eating them as easy as picking them from your own garden.

I love chicories as, during winter, they each put on a beauty pageant like no other winter vegetable! It is not always easy to find the seeds but once you have them, you will see them popping up in your garden from early autumn onwards, forever, if you leave a few to go to seed. In winter they are less bitter but that bitterness is to be treasured, as do European cultures, because they instinctively know that foraging the hillsides for chicories and other winter herbs brings the strength of the land where they live, into the body.

Monthly Food Gardening Workshops

The first of my monthly food gardening workshops will be happening next weekend …. practical, fun and packed with local information (where to get stuff around here, when to do stuff in this area, how to avoid doing too much stuff, what stuff is important and what is not, who to share your stuff with etc etc).

Together we will get our hands into the soil and learn while we do a range of activities. Every month will have new topics and experiences. I will help you achieve a productive, beautiful, edible garden to suit your budget and your lifestyle by sharing mine with you throughout the year.

$30 / person, $50 / couple,
children (accompanied by an adult) $15

Sunday, November 8th, 3pm – 5pm and same time, 2nd Sunday of the month thereafter.

Register your interest by adding your EMAIL to the list here: http://doodle.com/poll/c3a6pg2nfa3zgszh#table

Or send me an email (gasp4winns@gmail.com)

Whether you already have a food garden or are just setting up, let me give you some tips to make your garden beautiful, your life less stressful, your food production suit your budget and household, as well as help you use what you grow, all year round.
Second Sunday of the month… beginning with
November 8th, 3pm – 5pm.
I would like to run monthly kitchen garden workshops throughout the year so you can follow the seasons with me and become comfortable with sowing seeds, raising seedlings, looking after the soil, incorporating nature and native plants, irrigation, managing insects and disease and much more.

I have lived in Tasmania now for 5 years and spent a lifetime before that growing food for my family in Adelaide. I started my first vegetable garden when I was 17 and my mother loved using it everyday. My father was a nurseryman and I grew up surrounded by 7 acres of nursery around our house. My mother says I have sap in my veins but I know nothing compared to my father, whose father before him started the nursery. I write the Kitchen Garden Guide for The Classifieds where I can indulge my love of writing, combined with my love of gardening.

Growing food and sharing it, cooking it and talking about it are really the essence of who I am. I like to look at the whole picture of world food for humans and spend many happy hours immersed in books to do with the history, geography and anthropology of vegetables. These are wonderful topics for rainy Sunday afternoon workshops!

Seed saving workshop

Ghee vs Coconut oil and Sept 21st at the Cygnet Market

Ghee vs Coconut Oil

There is a worldwide craze for coconut oil especially for use in hot cooking, such as stir frying. For several reasons I recommend using ghee instead.

I now have Pepe Saya’s ghee, from NSW 

We all want to do what is right for our body and for our family’s’ health. As people learn more about the effects of high heat on cooking oils, they naturally seek better alternatives and the coconut oil craze has actually caused a world shortage!

Introductory Offer

$7.50

I only have 10 jars, so be quick!

Ghee has been used for thousands of years in India and neighbouring countries where cows are plentiful. Ayurvedic cooking has always recommended ghee for its high nutritional content, very high smoke point, ease of use even for lactose intolerant people and its beautiful flavour. Not requiring refrigeration is another benefit.

Pepe's ghee

From the Pepe Saya website….Ghee, is clarified butter, which has been simmered until the milk solids separate, it is then caramelised over a low heat, the liquid gold which remains is passed through a muslin cloth to remove any impurities, bottled and there you have it, Ghee glorious Ghee.

Ghee is a favourite of those with intolerances to lactose or casein as it contains less than 1% of either of those potentially inflammatory substances, it has numerous holistic applications, can be stored without refrigeration for long periods of time, and is excellent for cooking with its high smoke point of 230c.

Pepe Saya Ghee is derived from our unsalted cultured butter, of course, and the finished product produces an extra special nutty flavour.

AND it is made in Australia, so it is also good for lower food miles, for Australian farmers and businesses and reducing the carbon footprint our government refuses to acknowledge!

Pepe Saya was on Landline recently, under the heading “Australia’s Best Butter”
Check it out!

Left handed gardeners

The razor hoe I sell, which is made in England and is a superb quality little hand tool, is now available for left handers. What a great gift idea for gardeners!

Time to Sow Summer Veg

My seed racks are bursting with new season’s seeds for your garden. I have one remaining heated cable to ensure germination. Ask me about it at the market.

Many people have asked me for bean seeds and now I have them. Although I would not sow them in Cygnet yet, where there is still a chance of frost, it is a good idea to get your favourites while you can!

pig-cover

Australian Permaculture Magazine Only at GaSP $9.50 Absolutley lovely!

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 GaSP home shop opening times:

 Thursday afternoons 2pm – 6pm

+ Friday mornings 9am – 12 noon
+ by request 

4 Winns Rd., Cygnet
By request means that you are welcome to ring me or send me an email to arrange an alternative time to suit you.

Spring in The Garden Shed

 

Watering Can range

Watering Can range

Spring Watering for Seedlings and Plants

It is gardening time and the doors of The Garden Shed are open.

I have the most beautiful Haws and Burgon & Ball watering cans, made in England from Sheffield steel which will not rust. Each has a solid brass rose that will last a lifetime. Available in a range of colours, not all in this photo. Prices are $75 and $120.

garden markers etc

Hand made, Tas Oak Garden Markers

Made by Mike in Woodbridge, these durable little signs with burnt-in text make lovely additions to your garden or perfect gifts for giving and posting. $3.50 each or 3 for $10

Mike’s wife, Tricia, makes our  calico, Cygnet Market shopping bags which are $4 each. And she makes all the net bags I use for my sourdough kits and workshops. Lovely, local, retired couple.

Ho Mi and Razor Hoe

The Korean ho mi has been in existence for thousands of years. It is hand forged from high grade steel and will never rust. I have had mine for about 15 years and give it a heavy duty workout all the time without there having been any deterioration in its shape or strength or sharpness!

The Razor Hoe is made from hardened Japanese steel and can be honed to be as sharp as a razor. It will hold that sharpness for a long time and is perfect for cutting weeds at the soil level and other jobs in areas where the ho mi is too big. Available in left and right hand models.
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Don’t forget about my fabulous yoghurt Cultures!

$15 will buy you enough culture to turn 100 litres of dairy milk into rich, creamy yoghurt full of probiotics. Soy milk culture also available.
That is only 15c / litre + the price of the milk.