Spiced Orange Blossom Honey Muffins

Makes 18 patty pan size

Heat the oven to 180C.

Line muffin tins with patty pans.

Ingredients:

2½ cups Four Leaf 85% light flour

6 tsp. baking powder

90g butter

1/4 cup sugar

2 good Tbl. Do Bee orange blossom honey

2 finely chopped or grated cooking apples

1/3 cup Tasmanian walnut pieces

1 tsp. cinnamon

2 1/3 cups made up of the juice of 1-2 oranges plus milk

1 egg, lightly beaten

Mix flour and baking powder together in a large bowl.

Rub in butter to coarse crumbs.

Add sugar, apples, cinnamon and walnuts.

In a small bowl combine beaten eggs, liquid and warmed honey.

Gently stir the honey mixture into the dry ingredients only until roughly combined and there is no dry four left.

Using 2 dessert spoons, fill all the patty pans with all the mixture.

Place into heated oven and bake 20 minutes. Check after 15 minutes and cover with foil if necessary.

When done, remove each muffin from the tins and cool on a wire rack.

Serve warm with yoghurt and a little extra, warmed Do Bee orange blossom honey drizzled over.

Great cold, in lunch boxes!

Gin and Tonic…. revolution!

Many people, including me, love a gin and tonic now and again, especially with Tasmanian made gin, but there’s a revolution happening that is turning this drink on its head!

Gin is a spirit which derives its predominant flavour from juniper berries (Juniperus communis). And I love adding a squeeze of lime to it, with tonic water.

From its earliest origins in the Middle Ages, gin has evolved from a herbal medicine to an object of commerce in the spirits industry. Gin was developed on the basis of the older word for juniper, ‘jenever’, and became popular in Great Britain when William of Orange, leader of the Dutch Republic, occupied the English, Scottish and Irish thrones with his wife Mary. Gin is one of the broadest categories of spirits, represented by products of various origins, styles, and flavour profiles that all revolve around juniper as a common ingredient

So, in order to revolutionise gin and tonic, we can now add a few drops of juniper essential oil and lime essential oil to good tonic water and we have a non-alcoholic health drink with the natural flavour of g & t!

Juniper was and is frequently used to support healthy kidney and urinary function, problematic skin and the digestive system, as well as helping to relieve tension and stress. It can also be used to support cleansing and detoxifying. Juniper berry essential oil is a steam-distilled oil from the berries and needles of the juniper plant. The best oils are sourced from Bulgaria, their indigenous region, and take a full THREE years to ripen to maturity.

Pure lime oil (Citrus aurantifolia) is a compound created by cold-pressing the peel of a lime and collecting the oil, much like the process of pressing olives for oil. It is most commonly used as a powerful antioxidant that supports healthy immune function, an internal cleanser and for its ability to positively affect mood with its stimulating and refreshing properties.

 

Juniper, lime and tonic

July Fermenting, Sprouting and more Workshop

Whether you want to stay healthy, regain vitality or are unwell, fermenting and sprouting will help you. These simple, ancient methods of preparing vegetables, nuts, pulses, seeds and dairy are still an integral part of the diet of most people in Asia, Europe and South America. Come and learn how to take charge of your gut, your health and your brain, by making simple, delicious foods for daily life.

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Various lacto-fermented vegetables and kefir cheese dip

Visit my kitchen and learn how to fill your life with healthy, delicious, naturally preserved vegetables all year round. Also includes kefir, yoghurt and kombucha. Workshop includes fresh kefir grains to take home.
$45 / person.
Then I will demonstrate how to sprout everything from mung beans and lentils to quinoa and whole spices. There will be plenty of tastings to whet your appetite!

Fermented foods and sprouts allow the human body to absorb all their nutrients and fill you with vitality.

For dates and bookings click hereTo add your name to the booking sheet, please read the instructions carefully as it is your email address, not your name, that is required.

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Lentil sprouts and herbs on baked beans with sourdough bread

Getting the best flavour from your spices

The Garden Shed and Pantry

Getting the best flavour from your spices requires just a little planning.  Here are some easy tips to get the best from your spices.

Masala Dabba and Spice Jars Masala Dabba and Spice Jars

  • Keep your spices in a cupboard or pantry, away from direct sunlight and preferably in airtight containers (metal tins or glass jars are best).  We sell Indian Spice Tins (Masala Dabba) – as seen on SBS’s Madhur Jaffrey’s Curry Nation. This will reduce the damage to the essential oils contained within the spices.  While they might look good, NEVER display your spices on a shelf above the stove – the heat from the stove will reduce their life.  Also, keep spices away from the humidity of the dishwasher.  Keep spices at or below 18 C.
  • Try to remember to label your spice container when you first open it.  Use a permanent marker to write the date on the container, so you…

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February at The Cygnet Market

My market stall on the stage at The Cygnet Market is where I showcase almost my full range of Garden Shed and Pantry products. 

See you at the market this Sunday, February 2nd

I guarantee that my products are fresh and I have a following of avid spice lovers who know to come to me for all their requirements as my spices are kept sealed and in the dark between markets. I also have yoghurt cultures and soon, milk kefir, when mine starts to multiply. English watering cans and best quality garden tools are my passion and I stock local seeds for growing the best vegetables in the Tasmanian climate. As well, I offer an eclectic range of garden and food books and Tasmania’s Clean Conscience eco-cleaning products.

If you would like a 5kg bag of anything from my lists below, please send me an email and I will hold one aside for you as I only take a limited number of them and they sell quickly. Gluten free is a special interest of mine.

The market is now one of the best in Tasmania not just for tourists but for those wanting to buy fresh, organic vegetables, fruits, breads, cheeses, wholefoods, dried fruits, olives, olive oils, eggs and coffee. Artisan cakes and pastries as well as Sally’s superb Chinese dumplings, fresh stir fries and savoury pancakes nestle into the hall with Ed’s perfect English pork pies and Cathy’s moist Dundee cake.

Annie is a milliner and her hats are world class; all designed and made by her in Cygnet. You will also find an extensive and infectious collection of rocks, fossils  and more from around the world, at Mike’s stall. Add to that the craftsmanship of local artists, sewers, photographers and card makers and you can soon see that Cygnet is the place to be on the 1st and 3rd Sundays, 10am – 2pm, all year round!

You can find all my prices on these links:

 Grains, flours, pulses and seeds price list

 

L’Abruzzese Organic, Australian Pastas

The Rest of the Pantry: Oils, Nuts, Dried Fruits, Honeys etc

The Garden Shed: Tools, Seeds etc

Australian Spices

From The Pantry side of my business I want to stock your pantry with the purest products available; free from chemicals, low in food miles and direct from farmers and makers. This is how I choose to eat and I cannot sell anything that compromises this philosophy.

I have been able to source various Australian spices from small businesses specialising in growing and / or distributing these bushfoods and I can stock your pantry with fresh spices at affordable prices.

lm leaves 2

Lemon Myrtle

Lemon myrtle is one of the well known bushfood flavours and is sometimes referred to as the “Queen of the lemon herbs”. The leaf is often used as dried flakes, or in the form of an encapsulated flavour essence for enhanced shelf-life. It has a range of uses, such as lemon myrtle flakes in shortbread; flavouring in pasta; whole leaf with baked fish; infused in macadamia or vegetable oils; and made into tea, including tea blends. It can also be used as a lemon flavour replacement in milk-based foods, such as cheesecake, lemon flavoured ice-cream and sorbet without the curdling problem associated with lemon fruit acidity.

lm in a bowl

The leaves of the Lemon Myrtle when crushed or infused exhibit an exquisite flavour and aroma not unlike lemon, limes and lemon grass. Creative chefs are using it in stunning ways across their repertoires from entrees to deserts. Lemon Myrtle has a natural affinity with seafood, chicken dishes, pork, Thai curries. Also superb in cakes, ice cream, pasta and soups. Makes a freshing calming tea. The lemon myrtle is a winner.

Tasmanian Pepper Berry

Tasmanian Mountain Pepper Berries can be used as a direct substitute for traditional Pepper in savouries,

Tas Pepperberry

Tas Pepperberry

pastas, bread, soups, curries, cheeses (particularly goat – marinated Fetta), egg dishes AND sprinkled over sweets like chocolate and fudge, in cream and ice-cream and on top of frothy hot chocolate or cappuccino for a unique spicy peppermint flavour.

The flavors emerge in all types of infusions; aioli, sauces, honey, cocktails, and vinegarettes; along with a bit of a pink/purple hue. It can be used in place of black pepper in all the usual ways, but with a very light hand. You can also try them in soups and stews or sprinkled on your favorite cut of meat.

Salt Bush

saltbush leaves

saltbush leaves

The Salt Bush leaves are picked fresh, and then dehydrated to capture the salty herb flavour then ground, ready for you to use. The salty flavour, with delicate herb tones, enhances quiches and other egg dishes, breads, scones, dampers and pastries as well as soups.  Salt Bush is high in Protein (28%). This makes it an ideal ingredient for Vegetarians and Vegans.

Get these and other fabulous fresh spices from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.