For Gardeners and Cooks at the June 15th Cygnet Market

New Season’s Organic, Tasmanian Quinoa

It has been an anxious time for me, being out of quinoa and having to wait for the farmer to harvest, sort, pack and send it from Kindred, in northern Tasmania.

Also from Henriette and Lauran, the Kindred Organics farmers, I now have buckwheat flour, whole linseed and rolled oats, all organic and low in food miles.

Other Tasmanian goods: From Callington Mill at Oatlands I have organic, sifted spelt flour, delivered by Smithy straight from the mill. I use this half and half with the Four Leaf rye flour to make excellent sourdough bread. Spelt is wonderful for pastry too. And then there’s the Tasmanian honeys, of course!

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Solid brass. Last a lifetime.
Made in Turkey.
I am lucky to have made contact with a Turkish woman who sells these direct from the manufacturer. Her English is a lot better than my Turkish but our email exchanges are difficult and I am often bemused by her answers to my questions.However, she sends me these gorgeous hand tools for the kitchen and I absolutely love them. They all grind beautifully and should last a life time.Two of them have receptacles at the base into which the ingredient is ground. A twist of the wrist removes the base and allows you to sprinkle it into your cooking pot.One is for finely grinding spices, the other is slightly coarser and is perfect for grinding oily grains and seeds, such as linseed.The pepper grinder for the table does not have a base and allows you to grind pepper directly onto your meal.

The coffee grinder has an adjustable coarseness (and is not pictured) and a base. Doing this by hand allows you to grind the beans rather than cutting them (which an electric grinder does). This is similar to stone grinding wheat to make flour, rather than cutting the wheat to make flour (as in a Vitamix or Thermamix).

Books for the Fireside Cook and Gardener

Winter is a wonderful time to dream. I stop work at 4.30pm, bring in the evening’s firewood, get the fire raging then relax for a while. I like to either read something deep and mind bending or gentle and beautiful.

I am always on the look out for new books to sell and right now I have some great winter reads.

Lunch in Paris: A love Story with Recipes is a fun memoir by Elizabeth Bard about the unlikely liaison between an American food novice stationed in London and a gorgeous Frenchman who lives in Paris.

On a more serious note is Chemical Free Kids: Raising Healthy Children in a Toxic World which begins by telling us about the chemicals routinely found in and on unborn children today. It is a vivid and important book for anyone with young children.

Gut Feelings, by Dr. Peter Baratosy delves into the foibles of the conventional medical profession, the unrelenting pressure on our bodies of food processing and leads us to some very common sense but not commonly explained conclusions about gut problems in this modern world. If you are feeling not quite right inside, then this could be the book for you.

Dr. Baratosy has recently moved from South Australia to Kingston in Tasmania and practices as a GP at the Kingborough Medical Centre. He and his wife are also regular customers of the Cygnet Market.

Free Range Chicken Gardens leads you through some wonderful ideas for coops and yards, for growing plants that chooks will and won’t eat and gets you inside a chicken’s head!

drying fruits

 

My Home Made Mueslis

 with apple-soaked, sun-dried apricots, peaches and / or pears

I make and sell two organic, raw mueslis. One is gluten free. Both are packed with all the organic, Australian freshly milled grains, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, dried fruits and nuts that I sell separately. I assemble them every Saturday before the market so they are totally fresh, unlike anything you will buy anywhere else!

If you have special requirements I can also make up supplies for you and your family.

My winter preferred serving method is to soak the muesli overnight in some apple juice and in the morning add some of my special, organic, sun-dried peaches / apricots / pears + currants + Johnston almonds which have been soaked in water or apple juice and stored in the fridge.

It all goes into the microwave to just warm through then I mix in a good dollop of kefir or home made yoghurt.

YUM and I feel great all morning!

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February at The Cygnet Market

My market stall on the stage at The Cygnet Market is where I showcase almost my full range of Garden Shed and Pantry products. 

See you at the market this Sunday, February 2nd

I guarantee that my products are fresh and I have a following of avid spice lovers who know to come to me for all their requirements as my spices are kept sealed and in the dark between markets. I also have yoghurt cultures and soon, milk kefir, when mine starts to multiply. English watering cans and best quality garden tools are my passion and I stock local seeds for growing the best vegetables in the Tasmanian climate. As well, I offer an eclectic range of garden and food books and Tasmania’s Clean Conscience eco-cleaning products.

If you would like a 5kg bag of anything from my lists below, please send me an email and I will hold one aside for you as I only take a limited number of them and they sell quickly. Gluten free is a special interest of mine.

The market is now one of the best in Tasmania not just for tourists but for those wanting to buy fresh, organic vegetables, fruits, breads, cheeses, wholefoods, dried fruits, olives, olive oils, eggs and coffee. Artisan cakes and pastries as well as Sally’s superb Chinese dumplings, fresh stir fries and savoury pancakes nestle into the hall with Ed’s perfect English pork pies and Cathy’s moist Dundee cake.

Annie is a milliner and her hats are world class; all designed and made by her in Cygnet. You will also find an extensive and infectious collection of rocks, fossils  and more from around the world, at Mike’s stall. Add to that the craftsmanship of local artists, sewers, photographers and card makers and you can soon see that Cygnet is the place to be on the 1st and 3rd Sundays, 10am – 2pm, all year round!

You can find all my prices on these links:

 Grains, flours, pulses and seeds price list

 

L’Abruzzese Organic, Australian Pastas

The Rest of the Pantry: Oils, Nuts, Dried Fruits, Honeys etc

The Garden Shed: Tools, Seeds etc

Introducing new honey varieties – Cup Gum and Mangrove Blossom

People often ask us about different varieties (or flavours) of honey when they visit the Garden Shed and Pantry at The Cygnet Market.  We like to be able to provide a wide range of products when we can and the opportunity has come up to add to our South Australian range of honeys.  Introducing two new varieties: Cup Gum Honey and Mangrove Honey to complement the very popular Orange Blossom Honey.

Cup Gum Honey

This is a light delicate honey, and is best known for its taste of caramel.  Yummy!

Cup Gum (Eeucalypt cosmophylla) is a small, winter flowering tree, endemic to South Australia.   It has distinctive leathery leaves and large fruit capsules with white/cream flowers. Cup gum is so named because of the shape of the fruit capsules. The Cup Gum only flowers every 2 years but rarely are the flowers prolific enough for the bee keepers to take their bees there. This year the weather was perfect for the cup gums on the Fleurieu Peninsula, south of Adelaide, and they flowered profusely. Luckily for us, John at Do Bee was quick off the mark and his bees have provided a great haul of this superb honey.

Cup Gum flowers and gumnuts

Cup Gum flowers and gumnuts

Mangrove Blossom Honey

This honey has a robust, sweet taste with a dark amber colour, thanks to the flowers’ growth in the saline coastal environment of the mangroves north of Adelaide, on the shores of Gulf St. Vincent. It has a complex and rich taste with added spiciness.

L to R Orange Blossom, Mangrove Blossom, Cup Gum

L to R Orange Blossom, Mangrove Blossom, Cup Gum

Orange Blossom Honey

We obtain our Orange Blossom Honey from John at Do Bee who takes his bees to the Riverland of South Australia (Australia’s premier citrus growing area) to assist with pollinating the orange groves.

orange blossom

orange blossom

Orange Blossom Honey is often made from mixed citrus nectars including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and limes.  It is a thick, very sweet honey.  Initially the aroma is of medium intensity reminiscent of orange blossoms.  With time, it takes on an additional delicate fruity aroma like marmalade with slightly citric acid tones.  Light amber to white, the lighter colour and milder flavour come in years when there is a large harvest and the honey is less contaminated by other nectars.  It will darken with age and crystallizes slowly into granules of various sizes.

Therapeutic uses: Orange Blossom Honey plays a beneficial role for intestinal problems and nervousness. It is recommended to treat insomnia, and is often added to herbal teas.

orange blossom honey grove

orange blossom honey grove

Organic products (including Tasmania’s Not Tonight Honey range and South Australia’s Mangrove and Cup Gum Honeys) can be obtained from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

Restrictions on transporting honey to other states within Australia:

Honey can not be taken from Tasmania to NSW/ACT or South Australia without a permit.  In Western Australia all untreated honey, honey products like royal jelly, and second hand bee keeping equipment are banned from entering the State.

Transporting Honey to Victoria, Queensland or the Northern Territory is free and requires no permits.

Not Tonight Honey

People often ask us for local honey when they visit the Garden Shed and Pantry at The Cygnet Market.  Why is honey from Tasmania so well regarded?  Is it because Tasmania has some of the cleanest air and water on the planet?  Is it because Tasmania is the only place in the world which produces the unique Leatherwood honey from the pristine rainforest wilderness on the West Coast?

Leatherwood flower

Leatherwood flower

Tasmanian Honey (Not Tonight Honey)

Tasmanian honey is primarily single floral varieties.  When bees visit flowers to gather nectar, the honey they produce has the unique taste, aroma and colour from that particular flower.  Depending on the season, bees in Tasmania can visit trees, shrubs and flowers such as Manuka, Blue Gum, Leatherwood, Stringy Bark, Blackberry and Prickly Box.

We usually have Leatherwood and Forest Flower honey varieties for purchase at The Cygnet Market.  The honey is produced by a local family (with a little help from their bees!).  Sometimes we also have Blue Gum and Stringy Bark honey for sale.  What is available depends on the nature of the seasons and how the bees are feeling.  Not Tonight Honey is currently available in small (310g) and large (700g) jars.

Leatherwood honey is Tasmania’s premier honey, accounting for close to three quarters of all the honey produced on the island. Unlike many aromatic honeys that offer a feminine perfumed scent, Leatherwood honey is musky and spicy.  The texture is creamy and smooth but it is not too sweet or acidic.  Leatherwood melts in your mouth and offers a lingering after-taste.  It does crystallize into very fine crystals and can get quite firm. To return Leatherwood Honey into its liquid, creamy form, gently heat it for two-three hours at under 100 degrees F.  To truly appreciate this honey it must be liquid and creamy.  After heating, it will stay liquid for many weeks. The colour is creamy yellow to ochre.

Not Tonight Honey

Not Tonight Honey

 

Not Tonight Honey Jars

Not Tonight Honey Jars

Organic products (including Tasmanian Not Tonight Honey and South Australian Orange Blossom Honey) can be obtained from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

Restrictions on transporting honey to other states within Australia:

Honey can not be taken from Tasmania to NSW/ACT or South Australia without a permit.  In Western Australia all untreated honey, honey products like royal jelly, and second hand bee keeping equipment are banned from entering the State.

Transporting Honey to Victoria, Queensland or the Northern Territory is free and requires no permits.

Renovations! GaSP!

A few months ago I had my thirty metre poplar tree chopped down.  It was on the north side of the house and took away all of my winter sun.  Even worse, the roots had spread and I feared they were going to damage the foundations of the house.  Now the top of the tree has been turned into a huge pile of mulch and the bottom of the tree has been cut and shaped into wood to make a garden setting.

A few weeks ago, the pantry was closed while we removed everything to install new shelving.  The pantry also received a fresh coat of paint.

renovating

renovating

My tree lopper / qualified carpenter, Corey (from Treemendous) , found the timber for free – local, recycled timber apple crates – saved in the nick of time from being burned!

I call this gourmet rustic.

Painting

Painting

Corey did a great job to put in new flooring and shelving and work out with me what would fit best.

So now I have lots of shelving on the left hand side (even a high shelf for displaying books) and lots of bench space on the right hand side.

Shelving

Shelving

Benchspace

Benchspace

There are special shelves for spices and a hanging wall for the seed racks.  It’s really great and I would love you to visit and check it out.

a big spice rack!

a big spice rack!

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To celebrate the newly renovated pantry, I am introducing the frequent buyers scheme – spend $20 or more and receive 10% of the purchase price in spices.

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Spend $20 and get $2 of spices

Spend $40 and get $4 of spices  etc

You may need a Spice Tin to store all of your spices and keep them fresh!

a wall of seeds

a wall of seeds

This week at the Cygnet Market

New Organic Products
We have sun-dried pears, cacao nibs, ground turmeric, cinnamon sticks and wild harvested long pepper. The range of spices I have is expanding every week and I get fresh supplies regularly so you can always be sure of the best flavours. In addition, we have limited stocks of the cutest little spice grinder from Turkey so that you can grind the spices you buy from The Garden Shed and Pantry!

Turkish Spice Grinder

Turkish Spice Grinder

Olives
This week is a bucket of the black manzanillo; beautifully ripe with a great, full flavour. $10 / 500g
The koroneiki oil I have now is very popular at $12 / 750ml bottle or $60 / 5 litre container.

olive oil large or small

olive oil large or small

Winter grains
It is porridge and soup time and I have fresh supplies of organic, Australian soup mix, pearl barley, rolled oats, red and green lentils etc etc etc for all your cooking needs. I often make quinoa porridge with 1/2 quinoa, 1/2 oats. Don’t forget, if you wish to mill your own grains, I have access to 20 kg bags of almost every organic grain grown in Australia, at very good prices.

High Teas Experience
Have you checked out our Travel the World on the High Teas workshop information? Please read all about it here. We are still taking bookings and there will now be an additional date (still to be determined).

Sourdough Workshops
There are workshops available in July and August to learn how to make Sourdough Bread.  You can access the doodle by clicking here.  You can read all about the sourdough workshops on the GaSP website and please contact me if you have any questions.

Looking forward to sharing with you my passion for fresh, organic, Australian ingredients, direct from the farmer or maker to me. It makes a world of difference!

Come and see us on the stage at the market this Sunday and remember to give us your best smile for our photographer and the GaSP Take 10 Competition!

All the best,

Kate and Lenny

Up on the Stage

Up on the Stage