Pine Nut Crusted Orange Cake

orange and pine nut cake

orange and pine nut cake

Ancient Greeks and Romans savoured pine nuts preserved in honey, and legionaires took them to Britain under Roman rule.  This recipe has several flavours of the Mediteranean – pine nuts, oranges and olive oil.  They blend together perfectly to give a subtle taste and wonderful texture.

50g Pine Nuts

150g rapadura sugar

120ml Patlin Gardens Olive Oil

2 eggs, separated

finely grated zest of 1 large orange

120ml of fresh orange juice

200g Four Leaf Organic 85% Flour

1 tbsp baking powder

Preheat the oven to 180C.  Put the pine nuts on a baking tray and brown in the oven for 7-8 minutes.  Oil the base of a 20cm springform cake tin, then line the base with baking paper.  Use the additional 1 teaspoon each of sugar and flour to dust the sides of the tin, and shake out any excess.

  • Whisk the egg whites until stiff, then leave to one side.
  • Whisk the yolks and sugar until well combined and pale, then whisk in the oil, followed by the orange zest and juice.
  • Sift the flour and baking powder together and fold into the egg mixture.
  • Fold in the egg whites and transfer the mixture to the prepared tin.
  • Sprinkle the mixture with the toasted pine nuts and bake for 40-45 minutes until well risen and lightly springy to the touch.
  • Cool until you can touch the tin easily, then remove the cake and transfer it to a wire rack.

This cake is delicious served fresh from the tin on its own or with slices of orange or other fresh stone fruits.

Store it in an airtight container if not eaten straight away.

Enjoy!!

This recipe and 100 others appear in Kew’s Global Kitchen Cookbook.  Kew’s Global Kitchen Cookbook is a celebration of the amazing variety of edible plants.  It brings together 101 delicious recipes using plants from all corners of the globe, along with stories of their history and discovery, richly illustrated with historic botanical art from the archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Kew's Global Kitchen Cookbook

Kew’s Global Kitchen Cookbook

Get this and other fabulous cooking and gardening books from the Cygnet Market or The Garden Shed and Pantry.

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For Gardeners and Cooks at the June 15th Cygnet Market

New Season’s Organic, Tasmanian Quinoa

It has been an anxious time for me, being out of quinoa and having to wait for the farmer to harvest, sort, pack and send it from Kindred, in northern Tasmania.

Also from Henriette and Lauran, the Kindred Organics farmers, I now have buckwheat flour, whole linseed and rolled oats, all organic and low in food miles.

Other Tasmanian goods: From Callington Mill at Oatlands I have organic, sifted spelt flour, delivered by Smithy straight from the mill. I use this half and half with the Four Leaf rye flour to make excellent sourdough bread. Spelt is wonderful for pastry too. And then there’s the Tasmanian honeys, of course!

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Solid brass. Last a lifetime.
Made in Turkey.
I am lucky to have made contact with a Turkish woman who sells these direct from the manufacturer. Her English is a lot better than my Turkish but our email exchanges are difficult and I am often bemused by her answers to my questions.However, she sends me these gorgeous hand tools for the kitchen and I absolutely love them. They all grind beautifully and should last a life time.Two of them have receptacles at the base into which the ingredient is ground. A twist of the wrist removes the base and allows you to sprinkle it into your cooking pot.One is for finely grinding spices, the other is slightly coarser and is perfect for grinding oily grains and seeds, such as linseed.The pepper grinder for the table does not have a base and allows you to grind pepper directly onto your meal.

The coffee grinder has an adjustable coarseness (and is not pictured) and a base. Doing this by hand allows you to grind the beans rather than cutting them (which an electric grinder does). This is similar to stone grinding wheat to make flour, rather than cutting the wheat to make flour (as in a Vitamix or Thermamix).

Books for the Fireside Cook and Gardener

Winter is a wonderful time to dream. I stop work at 4.30pm, bring in the evening’s firewood, get the fire raging then relax for a while. I like to either read something deep and mind bending or gentle and beautiful.

I am always on the look out for new books to sell and right now I have some great winter reads.

Lunch in Paris: A love Story with Recipes is a fun memoir by Elizabeth Bard about the unlikely liaison between an American food novice stationed in London and a gorgeous Frenchman who lives in Paris.

On a more serious note is Chemical Free Kids: Raising Healthy Children in a Toxic World which begins by telling us about the chemicals routinely found in and on unborn children today. It is a vivid and important book for anyone with young children.

Gut Feelings, by Dr. Peter Baratosy delves into the foibles of the conventional medical profession, the unrelenting pressure on our bodies of food processing and leads us to some very common sense but not commonly explained conclusions about gut problems in this modern world. If you are feeling not quite right inside, then this could be the book for you.

Dr. Baratosy has recently moved from South Australia to Kingston in Tasmania and practices as a GP at the Kingborough Medical Centre. He and his wife are also regular customers of the Cygnet Market.

Free Range Chicken Gardens leads you through some wonderful ideas for coops and yards, for growing plants that chooks will and won’t eat and gets you inside a chicken’s head!

drying fruits

 

My Home Made Mueslis

 with apple-soaked, sun-dried apricots, peaches and / or pears

I make and sell two organic, raw mueslis. One is gluten free. Both are packed with all the organic, Australian freshly milled grains, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, dried fruits and nuts that I sell separately. I assemble them every Saturday before the market so they are totally fresh, unlike anything you will buy anywhere else!

If you have special requirements I can also make up supplies for you and your family.

My winter preferred serving method is to soak the muesli overnight in some apple juice and in the morning add some of my special, organic, sun-dried peaches / apricots / pears + currants + Johnston almonds which have been soaked in water or apple juice and stored in the fridge.

It all goes into the microwave to just warm through then I mix in a good dollop of kefir or home made yoghurt.

YUM and I feel great all morning!

Books about Food, to inspire and vitalise

Whether you are interested in using a new ingredient, learning about a range of healthy cooking techniques, ancient foods for modern lives, vegetarian and vegan food ideas, understanding your gut, how to grow your own food or making a chicken-friendly garden, you will find something out of the ordinary at The Garden Shed and Pantry.

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Browse in my home shop

Thursdays 2pm – 6pm

Fridays 9am – 12 noon

and by request, at a time to suit us both

or come to the Cygnet Market.

1st and 3rd Sundays all year round

February at The Cygnet Market

My market stall on the stage at The Cygnet Market is where I showcase almost my full range of Garden Shed and Pantry products. 

See you at the market this Sunday, February 2nd

I guarantee that my products are fresh and I have a following of avid spice lovers who know to come to me for all their requirements as my spices are kept sealed and in the dark between markets. I also have yoghurt cultures and soon, milk kefir, when mine starts to multiply. English watering cans and best quality garden tools are my passion and I stock local seeds for growing the best vegetables in the Tasmanian climate. As well, I offer an eclectic range of garden and food books and Tasmania’s Clean Conscience eco-cleaning products.

If you would like a 5kg bag of anything from my lists below, please send me an email and I will hold one aside for you as I only take a limited number of them and they sell quickly. Gluten free is a special interest of mine.

The market is now one of the best in Tasmania not just for tourists but for those wanting to buy fresh, organic vegetables, fruits, breads, cheeses, wholefoods, dried fruits, olives, olive oils, eggs and coffee. Artisan cakes and pastries as well as Sally’s superb Chinese dumplings, fresh stir fries and savoury pancakes nestle into the hall with Ed’s perfect English pork pies and Cathy’s moist Dundee cake.

Annie is a milliner and her hats are world class; all designed and made by her in Cygnet. You will also find an extensive and infectious collection of rocks, fossils  and more from around the world, at Mike’s stall. Add to that the craftsmanship of local artists, sewers, photographers and card makers and you can soon see that Cygnet is the place to be on the 1st and 3rd Sundays, 10am – 2pm, all year round!

You can find all my prices on these links:

 Grains, flours, pulses and seeds price list

 

L’Abruzzese Organic, Australian Pastas

The Rest of the Pantry: Oils, Nuts, Dried Fruits, Honeys etc

The Garden Shed: Tools, Seeds etc

Spice notes and recipes by Ian Hemphill

Occasionally, something comes along that is just so impressive, it’s astounding.  My son, the chef, uses this book all the time.  We discuss the contents of the book and sometimes he would send me copies of pages on a particular spice.

No more!   Now I have my own copy (and a few others for those that are quick).

Spice notes and recipes by Ian Hemphill

Spice notes and recipes by Ian Hemphill

Spice Notes and Recipes is the significant work from one of Australia’s spice experts, Ian (Herbie) Hemphill.  This edition of 500 pages includes recipes and detailed information on how various spices are blended to create the ethnic flavours that are spread around Australia.  There is a recipe index as well as the spice index.  There is information about growing and drying your own spices and herbs plus the buying and storage of spices.  Spice Notes and Recipes is not only the definitive guide to culinary herbs and spices, but also a tantalising tour of the cultures that have been formed by the influences of the ancient spice trade.  It is a classic for every Australian kitchen.

Ordinarily, this book sells for around $60 or even more.  Available at the Cygnet Market or The Garden Shed and Pantry for a price so very low I’m sure the copies I have will be gone in a flash!

Check out the newly renovated pantry and the special Spice offer.

Cooking with Quinoa by Rena Patten

Cooking with Quinoa

Cooking with Quinoa

“Cooking with Quinoa” is the book I consult whenever I want to eat Tasmanian Quinoa, or when I want to make something gluten free.

Quinoa (pronounced keen-wah) is a grain-like crop grown for its edible seeds.  It is considered to be almost a complete food. It is very high in protein, full of vitamins, gluten- and wheat-free, cholesterol-free and the Tasmanian grown quinoa is organic.  An ancient plant native to the Andes mountains, quinoa is known to have been a staple food of the Incas.  Quinoa contains more protein and iron than any other product.  The quality of this protein has been likened by the World Health Organization as being closest to milk.  Quinoa is also a very good source of manganese, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, copper, zinc, vitamins E and B6, riboflavin, niacin and thiamine.  It has more calcium than cow’s milk, is an excellent antioxidant and is rich in dietary fibre.  Quinoa has the highest content of unsaturated fats and a lower ratio of carbohydrates than any other product plus a low GI level.  The health benefits of this wonderful food are particularly significant.

Now that Quinoa is grown in Australia (Northern Tasmania), it is not only its delicious flavour and the health benefits that make it worth eating, but also its low food miles.

Don’t forget we also sell Quinoa flour.  And at a reasonable price too.

Buy this and other great cooking and gardening books at the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry, Cygnet.

IYQ2013 – International Year of the Quinoa.  Read more here.