Ghee vs Coconut oil and Sept 21st at the Cygnet Market

Ghee vs Coconut Oil

There is a worldwide craze for coconut oil especially for use in hot cooking, such as stir frying. For several reasons I recommend using ghee instead.

I now have Pepe Saya’s ghee, from NSW 

We all want to do what is right for our body and for our family’s’ health. As people learn more about the effects of high heat on cooking oils, they naturally seek better alternatives and the coconut oil craze has actually caused a world shortage!

Introductory Offer

$7.50

I only have 10 jars, so be quick!

Ghee has been used for thousands of years in India and neighbouring countries where cows are plentiful. Ayurvedic cooking has always recommended ghee for its high nutritional content, very high smoke point, ease of use even for lactose intolerant people and its beautiful flavour. Not requiring refrigeration is another benefit.

Pepe's ghee

From the Pepe Saya website….Ghee, is clarified butter, which has been simmered until the milk solids separate, it is then caramelised over a low heat, the liquid gold which remains is passed through a muslin cloth to remove any impurities, bottled and there you have it, Ghee glorious Ghee.

Ghee is a favourite of those with intolerances to lactose or casein as it contains less than 1% of either of those potentially inflammatory substances, it has numerous holistic applications, can be stored without refrigeration for long periods of time, and is excellent for cooking with its high smoke point of 230c.

Pepe Saya Ghee is derived from our unsalted cultured butter, of course, and the finished product produces an extra special nutty flavour.

AND it is made in Australia, so it is also good for lower food miles, for Australian farmers and businesses and reducing the carbon footprint our government refuses to acknowledge!

Pepe Saya was on Landline recently, under the heading “Australia’s Best Butter”
Check it out!

Left handed gardeners

The razor hoe I sell, which is made in England and is a superb quality little hand tool, is now available for left handers. What a great gift idea for gardeners!

Time to Sow Summer Veg

My seed racks are bursting with new season’s seeds for your garden. I have one remaining heated cable to ensure germination. Ask me about it at the market.

Many people have asked me for bean seeds and now I have them. Although I would not sow them in Cygnet yet, where there is still a chance of frost, it is a good idea to get your favourites while you can!

pig-cover

Australian Permaculture Magazine Only at GaSP $9.50 Absolutley lovely!

_____________________________________

 GaSP home shop opening times:

 Thursday afternoons 2pm – 6pm

+ Friday mornings 9am – 12 noon
+ by request 

4 Winns Rd., Cygnet
By request means that you are welcome to ring me or send me an email to arrange an alternative time to suit you.

Advertisements

For Gardeners and Cooks at the June 15th Cygnet Market

New Season’s Organic, Tasmanian Quinoa

It has been an anxious time for me, being out of quinoa and having to wait for the farmer to harvest, sort, pack and send it from Kindred, in northern Tasmania.

Also from Henriette and Lauran, the Kindred Organics farmers, I now have buckwheat flour, whole linseed and rolled oats, all organic and low in food miles.

Other Tasmanian goods: From Callington Mill at Oatlands I have organic, sifted spelt flour, delivered by Smithy straight from the mill. I use this half and half with the Four Leaf rye flour to make excellent sourdough bread. Spelt is wonderful for pastry too. And then there’s the Tasmanian honeys, of course!

1-DSC_0004
Solid brass. Last a lifetime.
Made in Turkey.
I am lucky to have made contact with a Turkish woman who sells these direct from the manufacturer. Her English is a lot better than my Turkish but our email exchanges are difficult and I am often bemused by her answers to my questions.However, she sends me these gorgeous hand tools for the kitchen and I absolutely love them. They all grind beautifully and should last a life time.Two of them have receptacles at the base into which the ingredient is ground. A twist of the wrist removes the base and allows you to sprinkle it into your cooking pot.One is for finely grinding spices, the other is slightly coarser and is perfect for grinding oily grains and seeds, such as linseed.The pepper grinder for the table does not have a base and allows you to grind pepper directly onto your meal.

The coffee grinder has an adjustable coarseness (and is not pictured) and a base. Doing this by hand allows you to grind the beans rather than cutting them (which an electric grinder does). This is similar to stone grinding wheat to make flour, rather than cutting the wheat to make flour (as in a Vitamix or Thermamix).

Books for the Fireside Cook and Gardener

Winter is a wonderful time to dream. I stop work at 4.30pm, bring in the evening’s firewood, get the fire raging then relax for a while. I like to either read something deep and mind bending or gentle and beautiful.

I am always on the look out for new books to sell and right now I have some great winter reads.

Lunch in Paris: A love Story with Recipes is a fun memoir by Elizabeth Bard about the unlikely liaison between an American food novice stationed in London and a gorgeous Frenchman who lives in Paris.

On a more serious note is Chemical Free Kids: Raising Healthy Children in a Toxic World which begins by telling us about the chemicals routinely found in and on unborn children today. It is a vivid and important book for anyone with young children.

Gut Feelings, by Dr. Peter Baratosy delves into the foibles of the conventional medical profession, the unrelenting pressure on our bodies of food processing and leads us to some very common sense but not commonly explained conclusions about gut problems in this modern world. If you are feeling not quite right inside, then this could be the book for you.

Dr. Baratosy has recently moved from South Australia to Kingston in Tasmania and practices as a GP at the Kingborough Medical Centre. He and his wife are also regular customers of the Cygnet Market.

Free Range Chicken Gardens leads you through some wonderful ideas for coops and yards, for growing plants that chooks will and won’t eat and gets you inside a chicken’s head!

drying fruits

 

My Home Made Mueslis

 with apple-soaked, sun-dried apricots, peaches and / or pears

I make and sell two organic, raw mueslis. One is gluten free. Both are packed with all the organic, Australian freshly milled grains, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, dried fruits and nuts that I sell separately. I assemble them every Saturday before the market so they are totally fresh, unlike anything you will buy anywhere else!

If you have special requirements I can also make up supplies for you and your family.

My winter preferred serving method is to soak the muesli overnight in some apple juice and in the morning add some of my special, organic, sun-dried peaches / apricots / pears + currants + Johnston almonds which have been soaked in water or apple juice and stored in the fridge.

It all goes into the microwave to just warm through then I mix in a good dollop of kefir or home made yoghurt.

YUM and I feel great all morning!

New GaSP products at Sunday’s Cygnet Market

Come and see all the new and regular products at The Garden Shed and Pantry stall.

JUST ARRIVED!

 Organic, light sifted spelt flour from Callington Mill at Oatlands, Tas.
Here at last! Light sifted means that more than 50% of the bran is sifted out, making this a less heavy spelt flour. Suitable for bread making and, well, just about everything!

Rapadura sugar, coconut flour and oil: all organic 
None of these are Australian but so many people have asked for them I have relented. Now you have to buy them!

South Australian Pistachios: organic, roasted and salted

Fabulous pistachios from Mark in S.A. First 10kg box almost all gone already! You won’t find better.

Tinned Cod Liver as Peter Cundall recommends on the Saturday garden talkback show radio 936

I tracked these down and ordered from a supplier in Melbourne. They have been so popular I have sold out twice and now doubled my order. Be quick!

Cygnet Market Shopping bags: Calico, Locally made, Locally screen printed
____________________________________

Opening times for between markets at 4 Winns Rd., Cygnet

Thursday afternoons 2pm – 6pm
+ Friday mornings 9am – 12 noon
+ by request 

By request means that you are welcome to ring me or send me an email to arrange an alternative time to suit you.

____________________________________

Don’t forget to put your clocks back 1 hour before Sunday morning!!
____________________________________

February at The Cygnet Market

My market stall on the stage at The Cygnet Market is where I showcase almost my full range of Garden Shed and Pantry products. 

See you at the market this Sunday, February 2nd

I guarantee that my products are fresh and I have a following of avid spice lovers who know to come to me for all their requirements as my spices are kept sealed and in the dark between markets. I also have yoghurt cultures and soon, milk kefir, when mine starts to multiply. English watering cans and best quality garden tools are my passion and I stock local seeds for growing the best vegetables in the Tasmanian climate. As well, I offer an eclectic range of garden and food books and Tasmania’s Clean Conscience eco-cleaning products.

If you would like a 5kg bag of anything from my lists below, please send me an email and I will hold one aside for you as I only take a limited number of them and they sell quickly. Gluten free is a special interest of mine.

The market is now one of the best in Tasmania not just for tourists but for those wanting to buy fresh, organic vegetables, fruits, breads, cheeses, wholefoods, dried fruits, olives, olive oils, eggs and coffee. Artisan cakes and pastries as well as Sally’s superb Chinese dumplings, fresh stir fries and savoury pancakes nestle into the hall with Ed’s perfect English pork pies and Cathy’s moist Dundee cake.

Annie is a milliner and her hats are world class; all designed and made by her in Cygnet. You will also find an extensive and infectious collection of rocks, fossils  and more from around the world, at Mike’s stall. Add to that the craftsmanship of local artists, sewers, photographers and card makers and you can soon see that Cygnet is the place to be on the 1st and 3rd Sundays, 10am – 2pm, all year round!

You can find all my prices on these links:

 Grains, flours, pulses and seeds price list

 

L’Abruzzese Organic, Australian Pastas

The Rest of the Pantry: Oils, Nuts, Dried Fruits, Honeys etc

The Garden Shed: Tools, Seeds etc

Black Sesame Seeds

Black sesame seeds come from the seeds of the annual herb, sesamum indicum, and grow in long, oblong pods. They are tiny, heart-shaped, jet-black on the outside and white inside and are used as a flavouring.

Sesamum indicum plant

Sesamum indicum plant

Their nutty flavour is similar to but slightly stronger than white or yellow sesame seeds. They are often used for their aesthetic appeal, as a contrast to white-coloured food such as bread rolls.  Toasting black sesame seeds releases beneficial chemicals as well as enhancing the flavor.   Black sesame seeds enjoy a long shelf life and resist rancidity.

black sesame seeds

black sesame seeds

Sesame seed is considered to be the oldest oilseed crop known to humanity.  Sesame has many species, and most are wild.  Most wild species of sesame are native to sub-Saharan Africa, although some believe the plant originated in India.  The famous saying “Open sesame!” came from the sesame seed pod which bursts open when ripe.

Black sesame seeds are used in Japanese and Chinese cookery to flavour salads, tofu, dressings, dipping sauces, cakes, biscuits, confectionery, desserts, ice creams and drinks. The Japanese dry-roast them lightly before use, then combine them with salt and use the mixture as a popular table condiment called goma-shio (‘sesame salt’), which is sprinkled over rice.

Get these and other fabulous fresh spices from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

Check out the newly renovated pantry and the special Spice offer.

Apple Cider Vinegar

We have been selling Apple Cider Vinegar from day one and it seems to be getting more and more popular.  We sell Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) that was made by a local man who is no longer with us.  We understand that the man regularly used local organic apples to make his ACV, however, as the ingredients are not able to be confirmed, we do not promote this product as being organic.

The ACV that we sell, is decanted from larger drums so bottles may contain traces of “mother”.  The “mother” is a substance composed of a form of cellulose and acetic acid bacteria that develops on fermenting alcoholic liquids, which turns alcohol into acetic acid with the help of oxygen from the air. It is added to wine, cider, or other alcoholic liquids to produce vinegar.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar

As well as this ACV, that we sell in 750ml bottles for just $5.00, we also have “Super Strong ACV” which we sell in two litre bottles.  The “Super Strong ACV” is suitable for feeding animals and for dilution, depending on the use required.

Vinegar (including ACV) is used directly as a condiment, and in the pickling of vegetables and other foods.  Vinegar was known early in civilization as the natural result of air exposure to beer and wine, because acetic acid-producing bacteria are present globally.

We know our customers use ACV for:

  • vegetable wash (5% solution)
  • salad dressing
  • cleaning agent (particularly in the bathroom and on hard surfaces)
  • sunburn relief (dilute and pat on burnt skin or add a cupful to your bath)
  • wart removal
  • digestive tonic

Tell us what you use ACV for by commenting below: