Green Peppercorns…. a story

From The Pantry side of my business I want to stock your pantry with the purest products available; free from chemicals, low in food miles and direct from farmers and makers, wherever possible. This is how I choose to eat and I cannot sell anything that compromises this philosophy.  Since most spices, even today, are grown in their native country of origin, without any fertilisers or other chemicals, I research them carefully and only sell the best quality, freshest spices I can source.

One day at the Cygnet Market a young Frenchman came up to me and asked if, amongst all the beautiful, fresh spices I had displayed on the stall, were there any green peppercorns.
I replied that I did not have them as I only had dried spices, (not the little tins of pickled, fresh, green peppercorns I was familiar with).

He assured me that in France people make a beautiful sauce with ground, dried green peppercorns….. of course I asked him for the recipe and told him I would have the dried green peppercorns he requested, at the next market, if I could find them.

Well, find them I did and make the sauce I did. Typically simple yet unique and delicious, as French foods often are, I have written out the young Frenchman’s recipe below and hope you will try it. He recommended we have it with a grilled piece of meat so I used local chops (killed and hung for 2 weeks at the Cradoc Abattoir).

The Green Peppercorn is the seventh in the GaSP range (the others being Tas Pepperberry, Indonesian Long Pepper, Sichuan Pepper and Black, White and Red Peppercorns).

green peppercorns on the vine

green peppercorns on the vine

Peppercorns, and the ground pepper derived from them, may be described simply as pepper, or more precisely as black pepper (cooked and dried unripe fruit), green pepper (dried unripe fruit) and white pepper (dried ripe seeds).  Black pepper is native to south India, and is extensively cultivated there and elsewhere in tropical regions.

Green Peppercorns: Green Peppercorns are the unripe berries of a tropical vine, Piper Nigrum. The same berries are processed to make black pepper. Green peppercorns have a milder but more complex and fresh flavor than most other peppercorns, and are commonly found preserved in brine or pickled. Pickled green peppercorns can be sliced or chopped, or eaten whole (pickled). You might not try that with black pepper, but the green peppercorns have a much suppressed pepper flavor. In their various formats green peppercorns are popular in French, Thai, and Western European cuisines. Because they are perishable, green peppercorns are usually freeze dried, or preserved in brine or pickled. I only sell them dried.

green pepperberries

green pepperberries

Green peppercorns, in addition to being a culinary treat, have numerous health benefits. They are good for the digestive tract, reducing gas while increasing hydrochloric acid in the stomach which aid with digestion and helps reduce several types of stomach distress. They also help fight bacterial growth in the intestines. In addition, green peppercorns are high in iron, vitamin K, and antioxidants. The skin of the peppercorn is helpful in breaking down fat cells, so eating green peppercorns can even help you lose weight. A chemical found in pepper, piperine, may have some use in helping other chemicals work in the body, and it may have anti-cancer properties as well. In all, green peppercorns are a healthy and tasty condiment, and well deserving of their place on every table.

Green Peppercorn Facts:
Green Peppercorns are the unripe berries of a tropical vine
Green Peppercorns have a mild, fresh flavor
Green Peppercorns are not as spicy as black
Available freeze dried, pickled, or in brine

(Some info above sourced from http://www.green-peppercorns.com/ and from wikipedia)

French Green Peppercorn Sauce

(recipe from Romain, a local French customer)

Serves 6 (if the cook can resist sampling too much!)

125g butter

125g Four Leaf 85% flour

Make a roux : Dissolve the butter in a pan over medium heat. Add the flour.
Stir until the mixture forms a smooth paste which leaves the sides and base of pan cleanly.
Cook for a minimum of 2 minutes, stirring, to cook out the taste of the flour.

Gradually add 5ooml good stock (I used the bones from the meat from the abattoir to make a stock) until the sauce is thick and smooth.

Reduce the heat and stir in :

1 heaped tsp freshly and finely ground green peppercorns

1/2 tsp salt (to taste and depending on the salt in your stock)

2 tsp. balsamic vinegar (a dash more, to taste, if you like)

Serve as a sauce with meat / or drizzle over roasted, steamed or mashed potatoes

Bon appetit!

green peppercorn sauce

green peppercorn sauce

Get these and other fabulous fresh spices from the Cygnet Market or home shop of the Garden Shed and Pantry 

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A Wild and Woolly Tasmanian Spring at GaSP

I have a new crop of beautiful, English watering cans sprouting in The Garden Shed and Pantry (GaSP) for helping to germinate your seeds and to keep them gently watered until being planted out in the garden. I also have a huge range of Tasmanian (Southern Harvest) and Italian (Franchi) seeds for growing your way to health and prosperity! And, when you’ve done all that, I have Shani’s soap for gardeners, to clean you up 🙂 Read more below…..
Read the full newsletter here.
Local Soap for Gardeners
Shani is my new helper for the 1st market of each month and she also is a maker of many wonderful things, including a soap for gardeners’ hands. Not only that, but she has sourced paper to wrap the soap from The Paperman, who you may have seen on Landline recently. He makes paper from apple waste and more, in NW  Tasmania. Come and talk to Shani and buy some soap at this Sunday’s market. See more below…
September Sourdough & Cultured Butter Workshop
The never-ending story of my sourdough workshops continues. I love them and so do all the participants. Easy, foolproof, nutritious, delicious, no-knead sourdough made with freshly milled, organic, Australian flours; what could be better?Add to that your own, super easy to make, cultured butter, which costs an arm and a leg in the shops, and you are on a winner for your health and taste buds.
You can read all about it here. Click here to book. $55.

Hugh’s lamingtons, tarts and GF breads
Hugh has gone all out this week but again you would be best to be at the market early not to miss out on Hugh’s very popular lamingtons, lemon tarts, vanilla slices and GF sourdough breads at my stall… Last market I sold out again! Don’t go home disappointed. 
 
Tasmanian Wakame and Kombu
There is no other ocean I would want to eat from than the ocean south of Australia. We are so very lucky to have Craig Sanderson harvesting wakame and now kombu off the east coast of Tasmania. Seaweeds are full of minerals including iodine, calcium, iron, magnesium, selenium, zinc and much more. Read more below….

Nuage Blanc and Quark
Paris Creek is a biodynamic dairy in South Australia owned by Helmut and Ulli whose inspirational story you can read about here. From time to time I indulge in a batch of their most exquisite soft cheese which they call Nuage Blanc (soft cloud) and I have some to sell as well. They also make quark, which you can read about the health benefits of, here. Quark is on order and will be arriving soon. Reply to this email if you would like me to put some aside for you.

Square eftpos
The Garden Shed and Pantry now has credit card, debit card, chip and contactless payment facilities! Square is a simple and cheap system suited to every form of transaction. It may be cheap but it is not free, so I would still prefer cash but no longer will there be any inconvenience if you do not have enough cash with you! 

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Home shop open times are on the photo at the top of the newsletter.
Garden Shed and Pantry website
E: kate@gasp.online