New products arrive after the storm…

Unprecedented rain swept away lives, cars, cows and land last week in northern Tasmania. No freight went in or out by the ferries. Luckily none of my stuff was lost but many people lost goods coming in which were afloat in one depot and much produce going out could not leave. Finally my orders are arriving, with only one left outstanding and I have found out it is safe, at least.

Beeswax wraps

 

BeeKeepa Organic Wraps

Organic cotton fabrics with beeswax and jojoba oil….. does away with cling film for wrapping sandwiches, covering bowls and jars etc. I love the chook and vegetable garden fabrics too.

Various sizes or in a pack.

 

 

Egyptian Gold Flour 

Four Leaf organic, ancient grain grown on their farm in South Australia. From the Four Leaf website:

“Egyptian Gold Flour is derived from the ancient khorasan wheat thought to have been found in an Egyptian tomb. Gavin was given 6 grains over 30 years ago, which he promptly planted in the vegie garden. These grew well, so they were planted in subsequent years. It has been such an interesting process and we have learned so much from the exercise. The wheat grows about 30 to 60cm taller than normal varieties and has a beautiful black beard. It is very striking in appearance. The grain is nearly twice the size of normal wheat and we believe that the modern Durum Wheat is developed from this wheat. It produces a high protein flour and has a sweet, nutty flavour, and is excellent for pasta and bread.
Egyptian Gold Flour has similar properties to Spelt Flour and can be tolerated by many people with wheat sensitivities.”

This is one of the original grains used from ancient times to make sourdough bread. Research indicates it probably originates in northern Iran.  In parts of the Middle East and Central Asia, it has been grown in subsistence farming systems for centuries.  The flour is slightly more fibrous than wheat flour, with a sandy golden colour and a lovely earthy flavour – almost a taste of the fields.  You can use Khorason on its own, but it contains a less strong form of gluten than wheat , which can make for a denser crumb than we are used to with modern wheat.  You get much lighter results when you blend it with strong wheat flour.

Many people with wheat intolerances can handle khorasan and spelt. Luckily for us, khorasan from Four Leaf is not much more than wheat flour in cost and a lot less than Tasmanian spelt.

I would recommend using a very active starter, extra water and a long first fermentation if you are planning a straight khorasan bread.  It makes a very cakey bread – don’t expect big holes but it is not heavy! I prefer the straight khorasan, simply because it is so different in both texture and flavour.  But mixing it with wheat flour certainly makes it easier to work.

khorasan from sourdough forum

Khorasan sourdough……Beautiful colour and flavour with a tighter crumb but not heavy.

Who Gives a Crap….

Australian, recycled toilet paper and bamboo paper towels, both with aid to sanitation in developing countries. Check it out here.

crap

 

 

 

 

 

 

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