Australian Spices

From The Pantry side of my business I want to stock your pantry with the purest products available; free from chemicals, low in food miles and direct from farmers and makers. This is how I choose to eat and I cannot sell anything that compromises this philosophy.

I have been able to source various Australian spices from small businesses specialising in growing and / or distributing these bushfoods and I can stock your pantry with fresh spices at affordable prices.

lm leaves 2

Lemon Myrtle

Lemon myrtle is one of the well known bushfood flavours and is sometimes referred to as the “Queen of the lemon herbs”. The leaf is often used as dried flakes, or in the form of an encapsulated flavour essence for enhanced shelf-life. It has a range of uses, such as lemon myrtle flakes in shortbread; flavouring in pasta; whole leaf with baked fish; infused in macadamia or vegetable oils; and made into tea, including tea blends. It can also be used as a lemon flavour replacement in milk-based foods, such as cheesecake, lemon flavoured ice-cream and sorbet without the curdling problem associated with lemon fruit acidity.

lm in a bowl

The leaves of the Lemon Myrtle when crushed or infused exhibit an exquisite flavour and aroma not unlike lemon, limes and lemon grass. Creative chefs are using it in stunning ways across their repertoires from entrees to deserts. Lemon Myrtle has a natural affinity with seafood, chicken dishes, pork, Thai curries. Also superb in cakes, ice cream, pasta and soups. Makes a freshing calming tea. The lemon myrtle is a winner.

Tasmanian Pepper Berry

Tasmanian Mountain Pepper Berries can be used as a direct substitute for traditional Pepper in savouries,

Tas Pepperberry

Tas Pepperberry

pastas, bread, soups, curries, cheeses (particularly goat – marinated Fetta), egg dishes AND sprinkled over sweets like chocolate and fudge, in cream and ice-cream and on top of frothy hot chocolate or cappuccino for a unique spicy peppermint flavour.

The flavors emerge in all types of infusions; aioli, sauces, honey, cocktails, and vinegarettes; along with a bit of a pink/purple hue. It can be used in place of black pepper in all the usual ways, but with a very light hand. You can also try them in soups and stews or sprinkled on your favorite cut of meat.

Salt Bush

saltbush leaves

saltbush leaves

The Salt Bush leaves are picked fresh, and then dehydrated to capture the salty herb flavour then ground, ready for you to use. The salty flavour, with delicate herb tones, enhances quiches and other egg dishes, breads, scones, dampers and pastries as well as soups.  Salt Bush is high in Protein (28%). This makes it an ideal ingredient for Vegetarians and Vegans.

Get these and other fabulous fresh spices from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

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