Seed Sowing Guide – December

Kate’s Tip of the month:

Think about investing some of your holiday time to installing a watering system into your garden.  A relatively small investment will pay big dividends in terms of your watering time (and you will probably use less water too as you can set your watering system to come on at night when the evaporation is minimal and the wind has usually died right down).  If you already have a watering system (clever you) then take some time out to re-check all of the fittings and ensure that the drippers / sprays are not blocked.  

Permaculture Tasmania Seed saving workshop with Kate

Permaculture Tasmania Seed saving workshop with Kate

Sow these seeds in December:

Sow these seeds in the garden:

Beans, (Bush) ‘Windsor Long Pod’, ‘Butter’, Borlotti ‘Red Rooster’ and French ‘Provider’

Beans (Runner) ‘White Dutch’ and ‘Scarlet Emperor’

Beans (Climbing) ‘Kentucky Wonder’

Beetroot ‘Bulls Blood’ & ‘Chioggia’

Broccoli Raab

Broccoli ‘De Cicco’

Cabbage ‘Munchkin’ F1

Carrots ‘Merida’, ‘Amsterdam Forcing’ & ‘Scarlet Nantes’

Cauliflower ‘All Year Around’

Chicory ‘Red Rib’ 

Chives

Cucumber ‘Lebanese Sultan F1’

Dill, ‘Bouquet’

English Marigold

Kale ‘Toscano / Cavolo Nero’ &’Dwarf Blue Curled’

Kohl Rabi ‘Superschmelz’

Komatsuna ‘Green’

Leek ‘Bulgarian Giant’

Lettuces ‘Flashy Trout Back’, ‘Royal Oak Green’, & ‘Rouge d’Hiver’

Marrow ‘Long Green’

Mizuna ‘Purple’

Nasturtians

Pak Choi ‘Red Choi’ F1

Parsley Mix

Parsnip ‘Melbourne Whiteskin’

Pumpkin ‘Delicata’, ‘Golden Nugget’ & ‘Spaghetti Squash’

Radicchio ‘Rossa de Treviso’

Radish ‘Easter Egg’

Rocket

Silverbeet ‘Rainbow Chard’

Snow Pea ‘Oregon Sugar Pod’

Spring Onion ‘Bunching’

Sugar Snap Peas

Turnip ‘Purpletop Whiteglobe’ & ‘Hakurei’ F1

Winter Savory

We also have Marigolds and Nasturtiums which are great companion plants for your vegie seeds.

Sow in trays in the hothouse:

Basil ‘Genova’

Celery ‘Tall Utah’

Chamomile ‘Roman’

Corn, Sweet ‘Max F1′

Hyssop

Purslane ‘Red’

Tomatoes (six different varieties chosen by Kate and Seedsaver Sam)

Zucchini ‘Costata Romanesco’

Sow (and grow) in the hothouse:

Basil ‘Genova’

 

tomatoes in one of the seed racks

Kate’s Tip of the month:

Think about investing some of your holiday time to installing a watering system into your garden.  A relatively small investment will pay big dividends in terms of your watering time (and you will probably use less water too as you can set your watering system to come on at night when the evaporation is minimal and the wind has usually died right down).  If you already have a watering system (clever you) then take some time out to re-check all of the fittings and ensure that the drippers / sprays are not blocked. 

You can buy these seeds from my market stall at The Cygnet Market.

If you need any further advice, please ask. My father ran a successful nursery for many years in Adelaide and I have grown up amongst trees, plants and seeds. I want people to be able to grow their own food.

If you would like to purchase Cottage Garden seeds or Native seeds, you can order these from us at Cygnet Market.

All of my products are also available most days from 1pm at The Garden Shed and Pantry, Cygnet

Look out for the monthly seed sowing guide on the last day of the month, every month!

After the Cygnet Market……

What does a person do after the Cygnet Market?  Sit down and relax?  No……have a G&T and make more bread of course.

After the Market

After the Market

Recently, I have been experimenting with various flours in my standard sourdough bread recipe.  For this recipe, I used:

The verdict?  Excellent.  You might want to give it a try next time you make bread.

All of these ingredients (and other Australian Organic Foods) are available from the Garden Shed and Pantry and the Cygnet Market.

Cygnet Market Winner Wanted – Nov 17 – what’s going on?

Pictured below is the twelth winner of the GaSP! Take 10 voucher from the November 17 Cygnet Market.  Are they all shy or is there something really interesting on the table?

Nov 17 winners?

Nov 17 winners?

The first person who claims the prize will be entitled to ten percent discount off their next purchases from the Garden Shed and Pantry prior to the Cygnet Market on December 15.  If you know one of the persons pictured, please contact them and let them know they are a WINNER!!

The winner should email us here to claim their prize.

Organic dried figs

Turkey is the biggest dried fig producer and exporter in the world.  Approximately 2/3 of the world’s dried fig production and 3/4 of the world’s fig exports come from Turkey.  Figs were cultivated in their motherland Anatolia in the years of 3000-2000 B.C. and they were spread through the Mediterranean from Anatolia within time.  Turkish dried figs are grown under natural conditions and harvested and sun dried on racks under controlled conditions.  Figs were a staple food for the Romans.

Organic Dried Figs

Organic Dried Figs

Figs are one of the highest plant sources of fibre and calcium.  Figs also contain:

  • high levels of fibre, magnesium, iron (non-heme), copper, manganese, potassium, calcium and phosphorus.
  • more antioxidants than apricots, cranberries, dates, raisins and plums.
  • some B vitamins.

Figs are a great energy food and can be soaked in water for better digestion.  Organic dried figs make delicious lunch box treats and are great for cooking.

 Organic dried figs are available in three sizes:

  • 200 gram snack pack
  • 500 gram bag
  • 1 kg bag

Other snack packs available include Organic Sundried Apricots, Organic Sundried PearsOrganic PistachiosRoasted (lightly salted) pumpkin seeds, and Organic Brazil Nuts.

To complement our range of organic nuts and dried fruits, you can now purchase Organic Dried Figs at the Garden Shed and Pantry or at the Cygnet Market.  We also sell the famous, worlds best almonds, Johnston Almonds and local hazelnuts.

Enjoy the healthy eating available from the Cygnet Market.

Pumpkin and fetta quinoa risotto with basil pesto

This is a modified version of one of Kate’s favourite recipes.  We think you might like it too.

Pumpkin and fetta quinoa risotto

Pumpkin and fetta quinoa risotto

Cut pumpkin into 4cm pieces and steam it (you could bake it too) until tender.

Bring stock to a boil in a medium saucepan and add white wine.  Reduce heat, cover and keep hot.

Heat oil in a large saucepan, cook leek and garlic, stirring until leek is soft.  Add quinoa, stir to coat in oil mixture.

Stir in 1 cup of the stock; cook over low heat, stirring, until liquid is absorbed.

Continue adding stock, in 1 cup batches, stirring, until absorbed after each addition.

Total cooking time is approx 20 minutes with quinoa (approx 35 minutes if you use rice).

Remove pan from heat, gently stir in pumpkin, fetta and spinach.

Serve topped with Basil Pesto.

Bon Appetit!

Introducing new honey varieties – Cup Gum and Mangrove Blossom

People often ask us about different varieties (or flavours) of honey when they visit the Garden Shed and Pantry at The Cygnet Market.  We like to be able to provide a wide range of products when we can and the opportunity has come up to add to our South Australian range of honeys.  Introducing two new varieties: Cup Gum Honey and Mangrove Honey to complement the very popular Orange Blossom Honey.

Cup Gum Honey

This is a light delicate honey, and is best known for its taste of caramel.  Yummy!

Cup Gum (Eeucalypt cosmophylla) is a small, winter flowering tree, endemic to South Australia.   It has distinctive leathery leaves and large fruit capsules with white/cream flowers. Cup gum is so named because of the shape of the fruit capsules. The Cup Gum only flowers every 2 years but rarely are the flowers prolific enough for the bee keepers to take their bees there. This year the weather was perfect for the cup gums on the Fleurieu Peninsula, south of Adelaide, and they flowered profusely. Luckily for us, John at Do Bee was quick off the mark and his bees have provided a great haul of this superb honey.

Cup Gum flowers and gumnuts

Cup Gum flowers and gumnuts

Mangrove Blossom Honey

This honey has a robust, sweet taste with a dark amber colour, thanks to the flowers’ growth in the saline coastal environment of the mangroves north of Adelaide, on the shores of Gulf St. Vincent. It has a complex and rich taste with added spiciness.

L to R Orange Blossom, Mangrove Blossom, Cup Gum

L to R Orange Blossom, Mangrove Blossom, Cup Gum

Orange Blossom Honey

We obtain our Orange Blossom Honey from John at Do Bee who takes his bees to the Riverland of South Australia (Australia’s premier citrus growing area) to assist with pollinating the orange groves.

orange blossom

orange blossom

Orange Blossom Honey is often made from mixed citrus nectars including oranges, grapefruit, lemons, mandarins and limes.  It is a thick, very sweet honey.  Initially the aroma is of medium intensity reminiscent of orange blossoms.  With time, it takes on an additional delicate fruity aroma like marmalade with slightly citric acid tones.  Light amber to white, the lighter colour and milder flavour come in years when there is a large harvest and the honey is less contaminated by other nectars.  It will darken with age and crystallizes slowly into granules of various sizes.

Therapeutic uses: Orange Blossom Honey plays a beneficial role for intestinal problems and nervousness. It is recommended to treat insomnia, and is often added to herbal teas.

orange blossom honey grove

orange blossom honey grove

Organic products (including Tasmania’s Not Tonight Honey range and South Australia’s Mangrove and Cup Gum Honeys) can be obtained from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

Restrictions on transporting honey to other states within Australia:

Honey can not be taken from Tasmania to NSW/ACT or South Australia without a permit.  In Western Australia all untreated honey, honey products like royal jelly, and second hand bee keeping equipment are banned from entering the State.

Transporting Honey to Victoria, Queensland or the Northern Territory is free and requires no permits.