Lemon Myrtle leaf

From The Pantry side of my business I want to stock your pantry with the purest products available; free from chemicals, low in food miles and direct from farmers and makers. This is how I choose to eat and I cannot sell anything that compromises this philosophy.

I have been able to source various Australian spices from small businesses specialising in growing and / or distributing these bushfoods and I can stock your pantry with fresh spices at affordable prices.

lm leaves 2

Backhousia citriodora (common names lemon myrtle, lemon scented myrtle, lemon scented ironwood) is a flowering plant in the family Myrtaceae, genus Backhousia. It is endemic to subtropical rainforests of central and south-eastern Queensland, however it is grown elsewhere with success. Other common names are sweet verbena tree, sweet verbena myrtle, lemon scented verbena, and lemon scented backhousia.

Uses

Indigenous Australians have long used lemon myrtle, both in cuisine and as a healing plant. The oil has the highest citral purity; usually between 90-97% citral, typically higher than lemongrass. It is also considered to have a “cleaner and sweeter” aroma than comparable sources of citral–lemongrass (75%),  the tropical Verbena (74%), and the Lemon Scented Tea Tree (80%).
Culinary

Lemon myrtle is one of the well known bushfood flavours and is sometimes referred to as the “Queen of the lemon herbs”. The leaf is often used as dried flakes, or in the form of an encapsulated flavour essence for enhanced shelf-life. It has a range of uses, such as lemon myrtle flakes in shortbread; flavouring in pasta; whole leaf with baked fish; infused in macadamia or vegetable oils; and made into tea, including tea blends. It can also be used as a lemon flavour replacement in milk-based foods, such as cheesecake, lemon flavoured ice-cream and sorbet without the curdling problem associated with lemon fruit acidity.

lm in a bowl

The leaves of the Lemon Myrtle when crushed or infused exhibit an exquisite flavour and aroma not unlike lemon, limes and lemon grass. Creative chefs are using it in stunning ways across their repertoires from entrees to deserts. Lemon Myrtle has a natural affinity with seafood, chicken dishes, pork, Thai curries. Also superb in cakes, ice cream, pasta and soups. Makes a freshing calming tea. The lemon myrtle is a winner.

Get these and other fabulous fresh spices from the Cygnet Market or at the Garden Shed and Pantry.

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2 thoughts on “Lemon Myrtle leaf

  1. Pingback: Australian Spices | The Garden Shed and Pantry

  2. Pingback: Roast Potatoes with Indian and Australian spices | The Garden Shed and Pantry

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